Science

  • Physical Science

    This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

    Honors Option: Components are in each module. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Biology

    This course guides students through the study of living and non-living systems and how they interact with one another. Students explore the world they live in by posing questions and seeking answers through scientific inquiry. Discovery takes place through observation and data collection. The students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity, and evolution of living matter. This is a course with real relevance. It encourages curiosity and provides opportunity for students to work on hands on lab activities and develop relationships through collaboratively learning. Engaging in the study of biological science broadens the picture of the world around us.

    Honors option: components are throughout course and noted in syllabus. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Chemistry

    Chemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. This course contains several laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures that are an integral part of the learning experience. This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course serves as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The utilization of scientific inquiry, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

    Honors Option: Each module will have additional coursework. 

    • Prerequisites: Algebra l
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Earth Space Science

    Be captivated by the wonders and beauty of the third planet from our Sun, Earth. Be amazed by what awaits your discovery within our solar system and beyond. It is your turn to explore the universe. Earth/Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces that shape our world. Through experimentation and investigation, students will explore the earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, crysosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. Students will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. Students will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, students will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the world around them, becoming better caretakers of our planet, Earth.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Marine Science

    As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, students will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. Students will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring every day in our precious ecosystems. Students will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. They will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Forensic Science

    Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, students examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy are examined. This course satisfies an elective credit.

    • Prerequisites: 10th-12th grade status recommended
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Forensic Science 2

    Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Great Minds in Science

    Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Criminology

    In today’s society, crime and deviant behavior are often one of the top concerns of society members. From the nightly news to personal experiences with victimization, crime seems to be all around us. In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime. In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Astronomy

    Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Anatomy & Physiology

    Explore the organization of the human body and how it works. Acquire knowledge necessary to understand what the body is doing and how you can help the body cope with many different situations. Body systems will be studied in order to understand how their structure, location, and function allow for interaction with other parts of the body. This version of Anatomy and Physiology is fully compatible with mobile devices. Students can access all course materials, interactivities, and assessments from their tablet or smart phone.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP Biology

    his challenging course is designed to provide a college-level experience and prepare students for the AP exam in early May. Over two semesters, the students are engaged in a wide variety of activities, with substantial emphasis on interpreting and collecting data in virtual labs, writing analytical essays and mastering Biology concepts and connections. The key themes of the AP Biology course are: the scientific processes, the affects of science on technology and society, the chemistry and make up of living organisms, genetics, diversity, and evolution.  

    Throughout this course you will be expected to answer questions, reflect on issues and complete lab activities. The primary emphasis is to develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorizing terms and technical details. The course will successfully prepare you for the AP Exam in May.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Advanced Placement
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Physics

    We stand on the shoulders of giants. Whether by observation, experimentation or brilliant insight, the progress of physics through the centuries has been advanced by scientific geniuses who wanted to know how things work. You’ll find out for yourself when you take this course and visit “Physics World.”

    In each “Physics World” module, you’ll discover the contributions of geniuses like Galileo, Newton and Einstein. In their work, you’ll learn the concepts, theories and laws that govern the interaction of matter, energy and forces. From tiny atoms to galaxies with millions of stars, the universal laws of physics are there for you to observe and apply. Using laboratory activities, videos, software, and websites, you’ll follow in the footsteps of some of the world’s greatest thinkers.

    This is a serious course that will make you think. It will also make you appreciate the beauty and importance of the science that governs our lives.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra I; Algebra II recommended.
    • Honors Available
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Biotechnology

    How is technology changing the way we live? Is it possible nature can provide all the answers to some of science’s most pressing concerns? The fusion of biology and technology creates an amazing process and offers humanity a chance to significantly improve our existence through the enhancement of food and medicine. In Biotechnology: Unlocking Nature’s Secrets, you’ll learn how this field seeks to cure such deadly diseases as cancer and malaria, develop innovative medicine, and effectively feed the world through improved systems. Learn about the history of biotechnology and some of the challenges it faces today, such as resistant bacteria and genetically modified organisms in food. You will research new biotechnologies and understand firsthand how they are forever changing the world we live.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

    Did you know that the world’s population could be as high as 11 billion people by the year 2050? And certainly, as our population is growing, so too are our food needs. Even today, millions of people around the world experience hunger. How can we balance growing populations and keeping everyone fed? This is where the importance of agriculture, food, and natural resources comes in! Through the study of Principles of Agriculture: Food and Natural Resources, you will gain a stronger sense of how food ends up on the plate and how we can maximize the foods and natural resources the earth provides. You’ll learn more about agriculture’s history, animal husbandry, plant science, and natural resources, and you’ll be better prepared for your part in sustaining the world.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Veterinary Science: The Care of Animals

    As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times…we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is studied and applied.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.