All courses are worth 0.5 credits per semester. Most courses have a Semester 1 and Semester 2 option. Classes are offered using the BrainHoney LMS (Learning Management System – accessible online) unless otherwise indicated.  All our courses are Common Core State Standard (CCSS) Aligned, and meets the requirements for the Oregon Diploma. All classes come with an Oregon licensed, highly qualified, teacher.

ORVED purchases curriculum from FLVS Global and AcceleratED.


All Courses

  • English 9

    Elements of writing are introduced through poetry, short stories, plays, and essays. Grammar skills are enhanced by the study of sentence structure and style and by composing paragraphs and short essays. Topics include narration, exposition, description, argumentation, punctuation, usage, spelling, and sentence and paragraph structure. Suggested for students entering 9th grade. 

    Honors option: Additional module with discussion based assessment, and exam.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • English 10

    Personal experiences, opinions, and interests are used as a foundation for writing. Skills acquired in English I are reinforced and advanced. Literary models are provided to demonstrate paragraph unity and a more sophisticated word choice. A research paper is required for completion of the course. Topics include grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, organizing compositions, and the research paper. Suggested for students entering high school as 

    Honors option: Addition content in each module with exams. 

    • Prerequisites: English 10
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • English 11

    Acquire the language, reading, writing, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Become a critical reader and thinker as you dive deeply into the texts presented throughout this course. You will learn how to effectively research and integrate your findings, as well as citing your sources. Suggested for students entering 11th grade.

    Honors option:
    Additional module with exams. 


    • Prerequisites: English 10
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • English 12

    Come explore the world of big ideas in English IV, where you are able to choose which path you will travel first as you explore highly-engaging, thematic units. Each path will guide you through a series of literary pieces that allow you to analyze the political, social, economic, and cultural messages of its time as well as its relevance to the world you live in today. Each path revolves around a central theme. The works in the course span a period of over 1000 years and have been written by authors who share common ideas, but employ a variety of literary genres to express their views. Whether it is the dramatic ending of a play, or the colorful images in a verse of poetry, the words of these authors will leave you with a new understanding of the world around you. As you travel down each path, you will create authentic work pieces that will engage you in higher-level learning and provide you with a greater understanding of literature and its connection to the world. Suggested for students entering 12th grade.

    Honors Option: 
    Two additional modules with exams. 

    • Prerequisites: English 11
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Journalism

    This course introduces students to the role of the free press in America in order to help them become more informed and more analytical consumers of media. In this course, students explore the history of journalism in the United States from its inception in the colonies and its key role in the first amendment, all the way up to present day issues regarding “right to know” and the changing landscape of journalistic media in the 21st century. Students will develop skills to actively participate in the consumption, analysis and creation of news media, and will have the opportunity to investigate the constantly evolving career opportunities within the field of journalism. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Gothic Literature

    From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Creative Writing

    For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP English Language and Composition

    An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. The college composition course for which the AP English Language and Composition course substitutes is one of the most varied in the curriculum.

    • Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, English l , ll (Honors), with a B+ average
    • Advanced Placement
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP English Literature and Composition

    Develop critical standards for the appreciation of literary works and increase your sensitivity to literature as a shared experience. This course meets one required English credit for high school graduation. For a year, participate in an AP upscale dining experience in the AP Literature and Composition course. Students act as food critics of exquisite literary cuisine. Menu items include reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by the master chefs, renowned authors. With intensive concentration on composition skills and on authors’ narrative techniques, this dining experience equips students with recipes for success in college, in a career and the AP exam.

    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I, II, & III. Student will be exposed to college-level composition and literature.
    • Advanced Placement
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Algebra 1

    Algebra I is the foundation—the skills acquired in this course contain the basic knowledge needed for all future high school math courses. The material covered in this course is important, but everyone can do it. Anyone can have a good time solving the hundreds of real-world problems algebra can help answer. Each module in this course is presented in a step-by-step way right on the computer screen. Hands-on labs make the numbers, graphs, and equations more real. The content in this course is tied to real-world applications like sports, travel, business, and health. This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve all kinds of mathematical problems. Students will also acquire the confidence needed to handle everything high school math has in store for them.

    Honors Option: 
    Both segments will have an additional project. 

    • Prerequisites: Middle School Grade 7 Mathematics or Pre-Algebra
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Geometry

    Geometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to build highways and bridges. Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, students travel a mathematical highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra 1
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Algebra 2

    This course allows students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’ journey through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate the effects of an equation on its graph through the use of technology. Students have opportunities to work with their peers on specific lessons. Algebra II is an advanced course using hands-on activities, applications, group interactions, and the latest technology.

    Honors Option:
    Both segments will have an additional project. 

    • Prerequisites: Algebra 1
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Advanced Algebra with Financial Applications

    This course walks students through the information needed to make the best decisions with money. Advanced Algebra with Financial Applications is an advanced course incorporating real-world applications, collaboration, and calculations using technology. Students learn the formulas used to determine account balances, monthly payments, total costs, and more. They examine budgeting, spending, saving, investment, and retirement. Students explore mortgages and other debt structures and how to make good decisions about borrowing money. This knowledge will propel students into the future with a good foundation on how to handle finances.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Liberal Arts Math

    This course will enable students to strengthen algebraic and geometric concepts and skills necessary for further study of mathematics. Learning will take place as students spend time at an amusement park.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra 1
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Pre-Calculus

    Students, as mathematic analysts, will investigate how advanced mathematics concepts can solve problems encountered in operating national parks. The purpose of this course is to study functions and develop skills necessary for the study of calculus. The Pre-calculus course includes analytical geometry and trigonometry. Pre-calculus is an Honors level course.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Calculus

    Walk in the footsteps of Newton and Leibnitz! An interactive text and graphing software combine with the exciting on-line course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. This course includes a study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions, and the applications of derivatives and integrals. This is an honors level course. 

    • Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry.
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP Statistics

    This course is designed to provide college-level instruction on the concepts and tools for working with data. Students collect and analyze data and draw conclusions based on real-world information. The course challenges students to explore patterns, think critically, use a variety of tools and methods, and report their findings and conclusions.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra ll
    • Advanced Placement
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP Calculus 1 (AB)

    This course offers a combination of assessment and instruction in an online environment containing but not limited to the areas of functions, functions and limits, differential calculus, and integral calculus. The course applies differential calculus to finding the slope of a curve, solving problems with related rates, calculating motion properties of moving particles, etc. It then applies integral calculus to finding the areas of irregular regions in a plane, volumes of rotation by various methods, and other scientific applications.

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a deep understanding of the concepts of calculus in order to prepare them for the AP exam and for further college and university calculus courses. Because this class is presented in an online format, the pace and schedule varies from student to student, and no additional topics are presented past the exam time.

    All the instruction is provided for the student, with feedback given for every exam, where students are required to give exact mathematical answers, often in sentence form, and describe, in detail, how solutions were arrived at, and the reasoning or theorems applied in the process. The teacher is also available at least five days a week for one-on-one support and help for the students, in addition to holding online collaborative lessons and offering discussion-based assessment to students.

    • Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry.
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Health Science

    Will we ever find a cure for cancer? What treatments are best for conditions like diabetes and asthma? How are illnesses like meningitis, tuberculosis, and the measles identified and diagnosed? Health sciences provide the answers to questions such as these. In this course, students will be introduced to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. They will explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases. The course presents information and terminology for the health sciences and examines the contributions of different health science areas.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Personal Fitness

    In this Personal Fitness course, students are required to participate in weekly cardiovascular, flexibility and strength and endurance activities. Students who are unable to participate in such physical exercises will be unable to complete the requirements of this course. Students who have an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) or some other physical limitation that prevents them from participating in physical activity should seek to enroll in an Adaptive Physical Education course.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Health Life Management

    Each day hundreds of decisions are made, including important decisions that have a huge impact on personal life. Making good decisions is a whole lot easier for those who have the correct information before making those decisions. Being equipped with correct information will empower students to manage real issues, like quality nutrition, substance abuse, coping with stress, and sexual abstinence.

    Good health is both mental and physical. Making good decisions starts with knowing the facts, understanding the consequences, and having the confidence to choose well. A series of signposts take students through the course, providing information, direction, and a little encouragement. Students learn to use important tools for communicating feelings and opinions. Other tools provide a foundation for becoming a savvy consumer in a world of advertising, credit cards, and focusing on earth-friendly practices that will help the environment.

    This course comes with a long-term payoff. Learning to make good decisions now  will set a positive direction to follow for the future.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Health Opportunities Through PE

    With a focus on health and fitness, this course guides student to be active and healthy now and for a lifetime. Effective strategies and techniques are a foundation of the course so that students can continually make improvements in all areas of wellness. Students, with the guidance of a training instructor, set personal goals in four areas of wellness: physical, emotional, social, and academic. Fitness assessments enable students to establish baseline levels of fitness and work toward improvement in specific areas. At the end of each module, students submit a wellness plan documenting their daily physical activity, progress toward goals, changes in fitness assessment results, and reflections on personal progress.

    By following individualized training principles, students can achieve personal success and gain confidence, while they develop healthy lifetime habits. The course uses videos, graphics, and interactive learning opportunities to encourage students to eat well, get up, and be active.

    Leading a healthy lifestyle is the best way to prevent health problems before they occur—this course helps students do just that. And now is the best time to get started.

    Recommended for students entering the 9th grade. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Spanish 1

    This course introduces students to the language and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Students learn how to introduce themselves and others, describe themselves and others, describe likes and dislikes, compare things, and give and receive directions. Grammar topics covered include the Spanish present tense, irregular verbs (ir, tener, ser, and estar), tú imperatives, personal pronouns, adjective agreement, and reflexive verbs. Students also learn about the history, cultures, art, music, and foods of several Spanish-speaking countries.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Spanish 2

    In Spanish II, students travel virtually through Central America and the Caribbean, spending time in museums, traffic jams, and even the hospital. In this course, students broaden their Spanish vocabulary and their knowledge of grammar. They meet people from many different countries and cultures. While waiting for the plane ride home, students also meet some Spanish-speaking people from different parts of the United States. The purpose of this course is to strengthen Spanish listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students also experience the beauty and expressiveness of a language that is shared by different people and cultures throughout the world.

    • Prerequisites: Spanish l
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Spanish 3

    In Spanish III, students will meet and virtually accompany four teens with Hispanic backgrounds as they learn about and travel to several Spanish-speaking countries. Students have many opportunities to use the Spanish they already know as well as to expand their vocabulary, knowledge of grammar, and experiences with Spanish-speaking countries. The purpose of this course is to provide many experiences where students can use Spanish. Completely immersed in Spanish, students speak, listen, read, write, and collaborate with other students in Spanish this course. They also gain knowledge and perspectives about Spanish-speaking countries and from Spanish-speaking people. Spanish III is a rigorous honors course and is not intended for credit recovery. Students will be challenged and need to have 8-10 hours per week designated to be successful.

    • Prerequisites: Spanish lll
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • French 1

    Semester 1 
    French is one of the most-studied languages in the world, with 175 million speakers in more than 50 countries. More than 30% of English words have a basis in French, so learning French will also improve knowledge of English vocabulary. Introductory French prepares the student for basic conversation in such situations as greetings and introductions, describing one's family, expressing opinions, and describing leisure activities. Learning to speak French can help prepare the student for a career in international business in French-speaking Africa, working with international agencies such as the International Olympic Committee or studying in a French-speaking country.With readings and media drawn from authentic sources, students see and hear the cultural context of what they are learning. Although the emphasis is on French spoken in France, students are exposed to the regional differences in French-speaking Canada and Africa, underscoring the global nature of the French-speaking world today.This course will introduce the student to the basics of French pronunciation, as well as common phrases for greetings, introductions, preferences, expressing opinions, and describing leisure activities. French culture will be highlighted as the context for learning new vocabulary and grammar. Students will be encouraged to draw comparisons between French customs and their own.

    Semester 2
    Learning to speak French can help prepare the student for a career in international business in French-speaking Africa, working with international agencies such as the International Olympic Committee or studying in a French-speaking country. With readings and media drawn from authentic sources, students see and hear the cultural context of what they are learning. Although the emphasis is on French spoken in France, students are exposed to the regional differences in French-speaking Canada and Africa, underscoring the global nature of the French-speaking world today.This course will continue with the everyday vocabulary and phrases for ordering food in a restaurant, asking for prices and making purchases, telling about yesterday's activities, and planning a vacation. French culture will be highlighted as the context for learning new vocabulary and grammar; students will be encouraged to draw comparisons between French customs and their own.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • French 2

    Semester 1
    Learning to speak French can help prepare the student for a career in international business in French-speaking Africa, working with international agencies such as the International Olympic Committee or studying in a French-speaking country. With readings and media drawn from authentic sources, students see and hear the cultural context of what they are learning. Although the emphasis is on French spoken in France, students are exposed to the regional differences in French-speaking Canada and Africa, underscoring the global nature of the French-speaking world today.This course will continue with the everyday vocabulary and phrases for ordering food in a restaurant, asking for prices and making purchases, telling about yesterday's activities, and planning a vacation. French culture will be highlighted as the context for learning new vocabulary and grammar; students will be encouraged to draw comparisons between French customs and their own.
    Semester 2 
    French 2B is a continuation of the introduction to the French language and culture students experienced in French 2A. This course is designed to help students develop the vocabulary and grammar needed to express themselves in a variety of settings involving the life and culture of French speaking people. The primary focus of French 2B will be the expansion of verb tenses. Students will increase their vocabulary skills, grammar skills, and master descriptions using interrogative and demonstrative pronouns. Students will be capable of describing a movie, health symptoms, and vacations. They will ask for, and give advice, as well as make recommendations.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • American Government

    Responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be effected by informed and active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights policy.

    Recommended for students entering 12th grade. 

    • Prerequisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Economics with Financial Literacy

    Economic decisions affect us every day of our lives. Understanding economics means thinking about how scarcity, or limited resources, requires us to make choices and evaluate one option against others. In this course, students will recognize examples of economics in your daily life. Students will see how the economic choices of larger groups, like businesses and governments, affect students and others. As students progress through the course, students will recognize that the costs and benefits of choices connect individuals and groups around the world. The purpose of this course is to help students become a smart consumer who understands the flow of an economy between individuals, businesses, governments, and the rest of the world.

    • Prerequisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • US History

    The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War through today. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. This course also gives students the opportunity to conduct research and apply their learning to current, real-world problems.

    • Prerequisites: This course is recommended for students in 10th or 11th grade. Successful completion of English 1 is strongly recommended.
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • World History

    In Segment I, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires. Journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. Students will also investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Segment II begins with a bang as students will learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment and the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Global Studies

    With more than seven billion people living in the world today, there are countless newsworthy stories waiting to be told. In this course students become real-world news reporters, researching and writing for the Global News Network. Students explore human rights, the environment, global security, international economic systems, and much more. Students learn how to perform accurate research and fact-finding missions, while learning how to present their discoveries with clarity and context. Students will also be able to identify tangible global problems and outline well-developed solutions. This course uses current and compelling stories to engage students in the world around them.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP Psychology

    AP Psychology is a college-level course providing students with an overview of the development of human behaviors and thoughts. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences. Psychology is a diverse social and biological science with multiple perspectives and interpretations. The primary emphasis of this course is to help students develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorize terms and technical details; the ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Psychology examination offered in May.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Advanced Placement
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP US History

    AP United States History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Seven themes of equal importance —American and national identity; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; culture and society; migration and settlement; geography and the environment; America in the World— provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places.

    • Prerequisites: None required, but strong reading and writing skills are recommended.
    • Advanced Placement
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Art History and Criticism

    Critique and compare significant works of art and architecture from Prehistory through the 16th century. You will analyze art history and criticism methodologies, explore media and techniques used by artists from various cultures and time periods, and learn appropriate terminology for discussing artwork from around the world. This course can be used to meet a performing/fine arts requirement for high school graduation.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Digital Photography 1

    Have you ever wondered how photographers take such great pictures? Have you tried to take photographs and wondered why they didn’t seem to capture that moment that you saw with your eyes? The Digital Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students will use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, close-up, and action photographs.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Mythology & Folklore

    Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Mythology and folklore have been used since the first people gathered around the fire as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. This course focuses on the many myths and legends woven into cultures around the world. Starting with an overview of mythology and the many kinds of folklore, the student will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit the gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle and watch as clever animals outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how they are still used to shape society today.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Physical Science

    This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

    Honors Option: Components are in each module. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Biology

    This course guides students through the study of living and non-living systems and how they interact with one another. Students explore the world they live in by posing questions and seeking answers through scientific inquiry. Discovery takes place through observation and data collection. The students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity, and evolution of living matter. This is a course with real relevance. It encourages curiosity and provides opportunity for students to work on hands on lab activities and develop relationships through collaboratively learning. Engaging in the study of biological science broadens the picture of the world around us.

    Honors option: components are throughout course and noted in syllabus. 

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Chemistry

    Chemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. This course contains several laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures that are an integral part of the learning experience. This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course serves as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The utilization of scientific inquiry, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

    Honors Option: Each module will have additional coursework. 

    • Prerequisites: Algebra l
    • Honors Available
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Earth Space Science

    Be captivated by the wonders and beauty of the third planet from our Sun, Earth. Be amazed by what awaits your discovery within our solar system and beyond. It is your turn to explore the universe. Earth/Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces that shape our world. Through experimentation and investigation, students will explore the earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, crysosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. Students will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. Students will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, students will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the world around them, becoming better caretakers of our planet, Earth.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Marine Science

    As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, students will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. Students will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring every day in our precious ecosystems. Students will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. They will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Forensic Science

    Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, students examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy are examined. This course satisfies an elective credit.

    • Prerequisites: 10th-12th grade status recommended
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Forensic Science 2

    Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Web Design 1

    The World Wide Web is not just for spectators.  It’s for people who can create effective, eye-catching websites of their own.  It’s for people like you who take this course and design web pages that get attention.

    In this course, you’ll become a Web Design Intern for a virtual company called Education Designs.  You’ll learn what goes on under the hood including:  Internet basics, HTML, and the file structure of a well-organized web site.  You’ll learn how to create visually interesting web pages with clear text, complimentary colors, visual assets, and appealing designs.  You’ll also learn how to navigate the Internet to fill your website with useful and well-researched information.

    Your web pages will have to be good because they may appear as information sources for other online courses.  The Internet can be a powerful way to reach anyone, anywhere - as long as you have the right skills and a little imagination.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Psychology 1

    What do you feel? How do you behave? What are your thoughts? Feelings, actions and thoughts are closely related and in this Psychology course, you will see how! Do you wonder things like why you learn the way you do, how you forget, and what makes you remember? Are you curious about mental disorders and what traditional and non-traditional therapy is all about? If experiments and role plays and dream interpretations sound interesting, then this is the class for you! In this course you will learn more about yourself and others including how to break a habit and how to cope with stress. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the subfields within psychology.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Anthropology 1

    The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present, future and address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in the course.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Sociology

    The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values and behavior affect the people around you and the world we live in? In this increasingly connected world, students will examine problems in our society and learn how human relationships can influence the life of the student. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world are also presented in the course.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Social Problems 1

    Students will learn more about the challenges facing societies and the relationships between societies, governments, and individuals in these areas. Each unit will focus on a particular area of social concern, often with a global view, and examine possible solutions at both a structural and individual level.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Sports & Entertainment Marketing

    Have you ever wished to play sports professionally? Have you dreamed of one day becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer? If you answered yes to either question, then believe it or not, you’ve been fantasizing about entering the exciting world of sports and entertainment marketing. Although this particular form of marketing bears some resemblance to traditional marketing, there are many differences as well—including a lot more glitz and glamour! In this course, you’ll have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. You’ll learn about how professional athletes, sports teams, and well known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become billionaires as a result. If you’ve ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event such as the Super Bowl or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, then this course will introduce you to the fundamentals of such a career.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Personal & Family Finance

    How do our personal financial habits affect our financial future? How can we make smart decisions with our money in the areas of saving, spending, and investing? This course introduces students to basic financial habits such as setting financial goals, budgeting, and creating financial plans. Students will learn more about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit, and money management. The course also addresses how occupations and educational choices can influence personal financial planning, and how individuals can protect themselves from identity theft.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Introduction Culinary Arts

    Food is fundamental to life. Not only does it feed our bodies, but it’s often the centerpiece for family gatherings and social functions with friends. In this course, you will learn all about food including food culture, food history, food safety, and current food trends. You’ll also learn about the food service industry and try your hand at preparing some culinary delights. Through hands- on activities and in-depth study of the culinary arts field, this course will help you hone your cooking skills and give you the opportunity to explore careers in this exciting industry.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Great Minds in Science

    Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Fashion & Interior Design

    Do you have a flair for fashion? Are you constantly redecorating your room? If so, the design industry might just be for you! In this course, you’ll explore what it is like to work in the industry by exploring career possibilities and the background that you need to pursue them. Get ready to try your hand at designing as you learn the basics of color and design then test your skills
    through hands-on projects. In addition, you’ll develop the essential communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, you’ll be well on your way to developing the portfolio you need to get your stylishly clad foot in the door of this exciting field.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • International Business

    The course further provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations will all be explored in this course. Students will cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in both business activities and the 21st century.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Hospitality & Tourism

    With greater disposable income and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in growing numbers. As a result, hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • History of the Holocaust

    Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Criminology

    In today’s society, crime and deviant behavior are often one of the top concerns of society members. From the nightly news to personal experiences with victimization, crime seems to be all around us. In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime. In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Language Arts 1

    Using a motif of Heroes, Helpers, and Hope, students in the Middle School Language Arts I course will acquire the reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Students will become critical readers and thinkers as they delve into fiction and informational texts within the course. They will also learn to effectively write narrative, informational, and argumentative pieces and present their ideas clearly and cohesively.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 6th grade.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Language Arts 2

    Using a motif of Mystery, Monsters, and Mayhem, students in the Middle School Language Arts II course will acquire the reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Students will become critical readers and thinkers as they delve into fiction and informational texts within the course. They will also learn to effectively write narrative, informational, and argumentative pieces and present their ideas clearly and cohesively.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 7th grade students.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Language Arts 3

    Using a motif of Innovation, Imagination, and Invention, students in the Middle School Language Arts III course will acquire the reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Students will become critical readers and thinkers as they delve into fiction and informational texts within the course. They will also learn to effectively write narrative, informational, and argumentative pieces and present their ideas clearly and cohesively.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 8th grade students.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Fitness

    Using a motif of Innovation, Imagination, and Invention, students in the Middle School Language Arts III course will acquire the reading, writing, language, and speaking/listening skills necessary for success in college, career, and beyond. Students will become critical readers and thinkers as they delve into fiction and informational texts within the course. They will also learn to effectively write narrative, informational, and argumentative pieces and present their ideas clearly and cohesively.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 6th grade students.
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Comprehensive PE 1

    Each community is full of fitness opportunities that enable students to achieve new levels of fitness through sports, dance, aquatics, and more! This course provides a foundation of knowledge, skills, and values students need to develop a physically active lifestyle. A friendly cast of course characters helps guide and enhance each student’s experience. Knowledge about safety rules for exercise, how to improve sport skills, how different activities target different body parts, and how to set and a goal are all part of student learning and participation. Activity choices are plentiful, leading to a healthy and physically active lifestyle. The Presidential Fitness Challenge encourages students to perform their best with a chance to earn the Presidential Fitness award. Students keep a log of physical fitness activities while they explore topics such as diversity in sports, nutrition, peer pressure, and making good choices. A few PE projects deepen students’ understanding of individual health and skill-related fitness, and the world as it relates to games and sports. Students choose various activities to reach goals they may have only dreamed about!

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for students in grades 6 & 7
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Comprehensive PE 2

    Team sports, extreme sports, and outdoor sports are among the types of activities students learn about and participate in during this course! This interactive, highly animated course helps students learn safety rules for exercise, how to improve skills, and how to establish and accomplish goals. It also provides an overview of many dual, team, extreme, and outdoor sports. Students have the opportunity to earn a national award by participating in the Presidential Fitness Challenge. Practicing game strategy to improve the chance of winning in competition, improving sport skill and performance, diversity in sports, nutrition, peer pressure, and making good choices balance out the topics students discover in this course. Fitness logs help students monitor physical activities. Students complete projects that lead to the knowledge, skills, and values they need to implement and maintain a physically active lifestyle.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 7th & 8th grade students.
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Mathematics 6

    The course is designed to engage students at every turn. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of number manipulation by applying it to real world scenarios. The course is packed with games that reinforce content and let students practice the skills they have learned throughout the course. Tidbits of trivia and activities throughout the course leave students with a smile.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 6th grade students
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Mathematics 7

    This course is designed to expand student knowledge about the transformation of shapes by sliding, flipping, rotating, and enlarging them on a coordinate plane. This course gives students the opportunity to create, investigate, and demonstrate knowledge at both intermediate and advanced levels. Students will be amazed with the skills that they accumulate while completing this course. This course is so full of animations, applications, videos, games, and real-world scenarios, students may think it is the latest video game.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 7th grade students
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Pre-Algebra

    Students who love interactive learning will enjoy Pre-Algebra. This hands-on course is full of slideshows, applications, videos, and real-world scenarios. The satisfaction that students gain from truly understanding higher level concepts such as functions and systems of equations encourages excitement and joy for learning. The instruction in this course will focus on three critical areas: (1) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures, through the use of distance, angles, similarity, congruence, and Pythagorean Theorem; (2) using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, solving linear equations, and systems of linear equations. This course is appropriate for upper level middle school students or as a high school review course.

    • Prerequisites: Recommended for 8th grade students.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Comprehensive Science 1

    Comprehensive Science 1 is the first in a series of three consecutive science classes. This course provides an introduction to Science, Energy, Force, Weather, Climate, The Earth’s Systems, and the Living World. Some topics are explored in depth while others are introduced to serve as building blocks for Comprehensive Science 2 and 3. During this course students will explore science through every day examples and experiences. Students will participate in activities and online laboratory experiences to apply what they have learned.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Comprehensive Science 2

    Comprehensive Science 2 is the second course in the M/J Comprehensive Science Sequence. In this course students explore: The Foundations of Science, Energy, The Earth and its features, The Earth’s internal and external structures and how they change, The Earth’s history, Living things and how they change and interact, Genetics and Heredity, and The Organization of the living world. Some of these topics are introduced and serve as a foundation for Comprehensive Science Three and others are discussed in detail. Students will learn through real world examples and virtually visit 6 different continents to see science in action all over the world. Students will participate in activities and online laboratory experiences to apply what they have learned.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Comprehensive Science 3

    Comprehensive Science 3 is the last class of the M/J Comprehensive Series. The course introduces new information and reviews some basics of science to prepare students for high school science coursework. Topics covered in this course include: The Nature of Science, Earth and Space Science, Properties of Matter, Changes in Matter, Matter and Energy, and Energy flow in the living world. During this course students will learn through real world examples and applications. Students will participate in activities and online laboratory experiences to apply what they have learned.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School Civics

    Learning about civics gives students the skills and knowledge necessary to be active citizens who have a positive impact on their communities. In this course, students discover the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States. They learn about the structure of the government and how it works at the local, state, and federal levels. This course examines elections, the lawmaking process, and how citizens can impact public policy. Students also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world. Geography and economics support the learning of civics in this course. Engaging in this study prepares students to be informed citizens who are ready to participate in the American democracy!

    • Prerequisites: This course is recommended for students in 7th grade. There are no prerequisites for the Civics course.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School United States History

    Learning about history allows people to see how far we have come and what awaits us on our path to the future. In this course, students will explore the history of the United States and analyze the cause and effect in historical events. They will investigate history by using the tools of a historian to examine the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events that influenced the development of the United States. Students will imagine what it was like to live in the past by reading the stories from the people who experienced it. This course begins with the engaging stories of what brought the earliest American colonists to the New World and ends with the struggles to repair the United States following the Civil War. Engaging in this study allows students to recognize the themes of history that span across centuries and leads to a greater appreciation of the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history.

    • Prerequisites: This course is recommended for students in 8th grade. There are no prerequisites for the course.
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Middle School World History

    Somebody discovered the wheel. Somebody discovered written communication. Somebody even figured out how to count to ten. From the ancient river civilizations to China and its ancient dynasties, different civilizations left their mark on history. They also left their mark on how we live today. In this course, students join travel agent Mr. Lightfoot to travel back in time digging out the past of these ancient civilizations. In ancient Egypt students visit the pyramids and find out the secrets of preserving mummies. They see how the Mayans developed astronomy to a precise science. They even investigate the difference between the Athenians and the Spartans. Students will journey through India discovering their contributions to medicine, moving on to Africa to follow the rise and fall of the ancient east African kingdoms of Kush and Axum. Throughout the centuries, and still today, our world is made up of dozens of different cultures. They all are different, and they all have made big contributions to what we know and who we are.

    • Prerequisites: This course is recommended for students in 6th grade
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Astronomy

    Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • One semester
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • Anatomy & Physiology

    Explore the organization of the human body and how it works. Acquire knowledge necessary to understand what the body is doing and how you can help the body cope with many different situations. Body systems will be studied in order to understand how their structure, location, and function allow for interaction with other parts of the body. This version of Anatomy and Physiology is fully compatible with mobile devices. Students can access all course materials, interactivities, and assessments from their tablet or smart phone.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.
  • AP Biology

    his challenging course is designed to provide a college-level experience and prepare students for the AP exam in early May. Over two semesters, the students are engaged in a wide variety of activities, with substantial emphasis on interpreting and collecting data in virtual labs, writing analytical essays and mastering Biology concepts and connections. The key themes of the AP Biology course are: the scientific processes, the affects of science on technology and society, the chemistry and make up of living organisms, genetics, diversity, and evolution.  

    Throughout this course you will be expected to answer questions, reflect on issues and complete lab activities. The primary emphasis is to develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorizing terms and technical details. The course will successfully prepare you for the AP Exam in May.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Advanced Placement
    • ORVSD
    • Two semesters
    • Worth 0.5 credits per semester.